Gold Coast Medical Community / Medical Network / Medical Conferences
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 A note from the gcma president
aug/sept 2019

Dear Colleagues, the new series of GCMA third Thursday of the month regular evening clinical meetings have been a great success!

On Thursday evening on 18 July at the Southport Golf Club, Slatyer Avenue, Southport we had the evening dinner meeting on the topic of 'Male Fertility Control’.

On Thursday 15 August we were informed about the new digital PET scanner at John Flynn Hospital that offers improved diagnostic accuracy and monitoring of cancer conditions.

In September we will be covering the welfare of younger doctors working in intern and resident positions. Our guest speaker is Dr Sam Hazeldine from New Zealand. He is an expert on optimizing and maintaining the mental and physical health of doctors, especially our younger colleagues. This meeting is a combined evening with General Practice Gold Coast. We anticipate many intern, resident and registrar doctors from our public hospitals will join us.

On 17 October we will have Icon Cancer Centre speaking to us on new developments in radiotherapy and chemo- and immune- therapy.

I look forward to meeting you at each of these important events.

In the Gold Coast Bulletin recently I noticed a story on the increasing attendances to the emergency department at our Gold Coast University Hospital. Apparently this emergency department is now the busiest in Australia!

We are so lucky to have such a good team working in this department with the professional commitment of so many excellent doctors and nurses. But this story highlights the growing health needs of our Gold Coast region. The explosion of housing developments and population increases at the northern end of the Gold Coast will soon necessitate the development of a new hospital and emergency department in that area.

Depending on the calculations used, the Gold Coast region has about 500 public inpatient beds less that what it should have based on conventional standards of bed numbers per thousand people.

The Labor state government has responded by funding an additional 40 general medical beds and 20 new mental health treatment spaces. While welcome, this is a very limited response given the large number of beds needed.

Until additional public emergency department resources are provided attention must be applied to support our public emergency departments. For those members of the public with private health insurance there are very good emergency departments at our private hospitals open to offer assistance.

However, a new model of corporation between general practices and emergency departments is under trial in Perth. The ‘Urgent Care Clinical Network’ has been designed to ease pressure on emergency departments by providing care at general practices for urgent but non-life-threatening conditions. The program is a partnership between the state health department and the WA Primary Health Alliance and the state AMA and RACGP. Patients with suitable urgent conditions are fast-tracked on the same day to GP office appointments between the hours of 8am to 11pm.

The Gold Coast University Hospital, General Practice Gold Coast and our local Primary Health Network (PHN) might consider running a similar project here on the Gold Coast. The GCMA would be willing to facilitate the process.

Your GCMA executive committee is now considering the form of a social function for members and their partners in November. If you have suggestions about this function please contact me on 0422545753, or our GCMA administrative officer, Serena Mills on 0415271474, or email us at info@gcma.org.au.

Yours sincerely,

prof philip morris (gcma president)



phil

A note from the gcma president
Jul/Aug 2019

Dear Colleagues, the GCMA third Thursday of the month regular evening clinical meetings are again up and running! 

On Thursday evening at 6.30pm for 7.00pm on 18 July at the Southport Golf Club, Slatyer Avenue, Southport we are having an evening dinner meeting on the topic of 'Male Fertility Control’.  In August we will be covering the new and improved diagnostic accuracy of the digital PET scanner at John Flynn Hospital. 

In September we will be covering the welfare of younger doctors in intern and resident positions.  I look forward to meeting you at each of these important events.

The return of the Coalition government has clarified the medico-political landscape to some extent.  We hope the Medicare item number freeze for GP and specialist consultations will be terminated.  Unfortunately, it seems that compensation for the many years the freeze operated for will not be paid to doctors.

Your GCMA executive committee is now considering the topic for the October clinical meeting and the form of a social function for members and their partners in November.  If you have suggestions about either of these two functions please contact me on 0422545753, or our new GCMA secretarial officer, Serena Mills, on 0415271474.

Yours sincerely,

prof philip morris (gcma president)

 
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A note from the gcma secretary
Jul/Aug 2018

Dear GCMA Colleague, our President Dr Sonu Haikerwal is on a well-earned short break.  While she is away I have been asked to provide a brief message for this edition of the Medical Link.

Our regular third Thursday of the month medical meetings has illuminated important topics this year.  The last meeting on the federal government ordained electronic medical record – My Health Record – was no exception.  Despite good intentions, this initiative has many ‘doubting Thomases’ – and with good reason.  Not all doctors are convinced that the contents of each patient’s electronic medical record will be that useful clinically.  Many are suspicious of the government’s intent of using the data obtained for non-clinical purposes.  Some doctors are not convinced that the security of the system can be really protected against determined cyber criminals.  And both GPs and specialists are underwhelmed by the financial incentives for doctors especially in the private sector to spend the time and energy on summarising patient information, loading up the data and maintaining or curating it on the system.  Despite a passionate defence of the My Health Record by our invited speakers I wonder how many of the audience were convinced?  It will be interesting to see how many of our medical colleagues decide to ‘opt out’ of My Health Record during the three-month ‘opt out’ period starting this month.

The GCMA has developed an enviable record of assisting Pacific Island nations local medical associations and colleges develop medical education conferences.  The GCMA worked with the Fiji Medical Association in 2009, the Fiji College of GPs in 2015, and the Vanuatu Medical and Dental Association in 2017 to support and enhance their annual medical education meetings by partnering with each group by bringing in Gold Coast specialist presenters and international keynote speakers to bolster conference programs.  Our Pacific Island colleagues have appreciated these efforts and we have learned so much about the health concerns of Pacific Island countries.  At a personal and association level our closer ties with colleagues from the South Pacific has enriched us all.  The GCMA is now looking to partner with the Pasifika Medical Association based in New Zealand and with the local medical associations and medical colleges from the South Pacific to run a medical education meeting in 2020.  A proposed name of the meeting is the ‘Polynesian, Melanesian and Australasian Medical Conference’ to reflect the both common and unique health and clinical challenges across the geographical, cultural and ethnic diversity of our region.  Please keep a look out for further developments concerning this meeting.  When a date and venue is set please put it in your diary as a ‘date claimer’!  It is possible this meeting will be held on the Gold Coast.

Finally, recent media and medical news references to doctor suicide have personally confronted me.  I think we often try to avoid this topic as a form of defence against painful information.  Many of us will know of a colleague who died by suicide.  How it could have been prevented or stopped is the question we all want answered.  But the solution is not clear.  I recently read the thoughts of a doctor who has made a study of this sad phenomenon.  Dr Pamela Wible posted an article on her website on ‘What I’ve learned from 952 doctor suicides’ (http://www.idealmedicalcare.org/ive-learned-547-doctor-suicides/).  She lists 34 characteristics of doctor suicides.  While the setting of her observations is in the USA many of the factors she lists are applicable to Australia.  I encourage you to review her remarks – they may just help us all assist colleagues at risk of suicide.  

I look forward to seeing you at our next Thursday evening clinical meeting.

prof philip morris (gcma secretary)

 
 

gcma conferences

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Fiji Conference

2015 conjoint medical conference of GCMA with the Fiji College of General Practitioners, Denarau Island, Fiji,

 
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vanuata conference

2017 conjoint medical conference of GCMA with the Vanuatu Medical and Dental Association, Port Vila, Vanuatu.